Site Information

 Loading... Please wait...
 

Kinetic Exclusion Assay Theory

As described on the Reversible Binding page, when a receptor and ligand reach equilibrium in solution three species are present, the receptor, the ligand and the receptor-ligand complex.
A Kinetic Exclusion Assay (KinExA®) measures the free concentration of either the receptor or the ligand without perturbing the equilibrium. (Note: In the following description the format of the assay is to immobilize the ligand to measure free receptor in the sample. Conversely the receptor may be immobilized to measure free ligand in the sample, depending on the materials used.)

Measurement of the free receptor is accomplished by briefly exposing the sample mixture to a solid phase on which the ligand is immobilized. The exposure time is critical because keeping the interaction time of the sample to the measurement solid phase quite short results in a situation where the only significant binding to the solid phase is from the free receptor. The Kinetic Exclusion Assay is in contrast to a competition assay in which the equilibrated solution is in contact with the solid phase long enough for the solid phase ligand to compete for the solution receptor.

The advantage of KinExA is that the signal from the captured receptor represents only the concentration that is free in the solution. Knowing the equilibrium concentration of receptor allows determination of the binding constants as described on the Reversible Binding page.

The commercially available instruments for performing KinExA assays (Sapidyne's KinExA 3200 and 3100) use a small column of particles through which the sample and other reagents are passed. The contact time of any portion of the sample with the solid phase is then the transit time through the column and can be controlled by the flow rate chosen (from around 50 milliseconds to about a second).

Systems with nM range binders or tighter will be in the kinetic exclusion assay mode (KinExA mode). Weaker binders can still be measured but may require extra care to avoid perturbation of the sample from the measurement. KinExA is particularly well suited for measuring affinity and kinetics and also works as an improved immunoassay platform. A more detailed explanation of the KinExA measurements are included below.

KinExA for Kd measurement:

Binding curves are dependent on Kd and receptor concentration (About Binding Curves). A binding curve can be generated by making a series of samples with constant receptor concentration and a titration of ligand. After equilibrium is reached, a KinExA measurement is made of the free receptor concentration in each sample of the titration series. Therefore the free receptor directly represents the binding curve. The binding curve generated is then analyzed to find the Kd (for low ratio curves) or receptor active concentration (for high ratio curves). Multiple curves with different receptor concentrations may be analyzed together to get both Kd and active receptor concentrations.

Using a KinExA assay for making Kd measurements is ideal because it can determine the free receptor concentration without perturbing the solution equilibrium that has been established with unmodified molecules, unfettered, in solution. For an accurate Kd determination the concentration of receptor in the samples should be near or below the Kd. With the tight binding antibodies routinely developed now (low or sub pM), the measurements need to be made at these very low sample concentrations. The KinExA's ability to make quantitative measurements at these low concentrations allow for accurate Kd measurements for those very tight binders.

KinExA for kon and koff measurement:

Measurement of free receptor concentration may also be done prior to the samples reaching equilibrium. Measurements taken as a system approaches equilibrium provide data for the kinetics of the reaction. Two methods can be used for kinetic measurements, the direct method and the inject method.

In the direct method, a single sample of receptor and ligand is prepared and the free fraction is repeatedly measured over time as it approaches equilibrium. The on rate, kon, can be calculated from the curve. This direct measure of the kinetic curve does require that the time the sample takes to reach equilibrium be long enough to allow several measurements to be made. The time of this reaction can be reduced by lowering the concentration of the reactants. The concentration, however, must be kept above the Kd for significant binding to occur, so some weaker binding systems cannot be slowed enough to enable use of this method.

In cases where the reaction cannot be slowed enough to use the direct method, the inject method may be used. The inject method can interrogate very short reaction times by injecting the receptor into a stream of ligand, upstream from the particle column. The incubation time is then reduced to the flow time from the injection point to the particle column. This time can be adjusted by the flow rate used, and if needed can be reduced to a few seconds.

Unlike solid phase kinetic measurements, the molecules in the reaction are unmodified and free to move about in solution. Some differences do occur between the solution phase and solid phase kinetic measurements1 with the solution phase measurement often faster2 – sometimes substantially.3

The off rate, koff, can also be directly measured, however it is usually just calculated from the measured Kd and measured kon, (koff = Kd * kon).

KinExA for immunoassay:

The ultimate sensitivity of any immunoassay depends on the properties of the antibody used. Most immunoassays do not fully achieve the potential sensitivity because either the readout method lacks sufficient sensitivity to take advantage of the antibody's ability or because competition is limiting the assay sensitivity. The kinetic exclusion assay prevents competition from interfering, and the measurement sensitivity (low to sub pM) can take full advantage of extremely tight binding antibodies.4

In practice KinExA has been shown to be 10 to 1000 fold more sensitive than ELISA using the same reagents.5 A study was conducted in Japan at the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and funded by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). The study compared different immunoassay systems by sending identical reagents to outside labs and analyzing the results of the most sensitive immunoassay for each set of reagents. The labs used were Biacore, for an SPR based immunoassay, Sapidyne, for a KinExA based assay, and Kyoto Electronics Manufacturing (KEM) for ELISA. For all 4 sets of reagents the KinExA assay was the most sensitive and had the widest dynamic range.6 In fact, KEM has since acquired a license to use KinExA for their commercial dioxin measurement system because of the improved sensitivity, speed, and accuracy compared to ELISA.

References

1. Blake II R.C., Delehanty J.B., Khosraviani M., Yu H., Jones R.M., Blake D.A. 2003. Allosteric binding properties of a monoclonal anti- body and its fab fragment. Biochem 42: 497-508. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12525177

2. Razai A., Garcia-Rodriguez C., Lou J., Geren I.N., Forsyth C.M., Robles Y., Tsai R., Smith T.J., Smith L.A., Siegel R.W., Feldhaus M., Marks J.D. 2005. Molecular evolution of antibody affinity for sensitive detection of botulinum neurotoxin type A. J Mol Biol 351: 158-169. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16002090

3. Glass T.R., Ohmura N., Saiki H. 2007. Least detectable concentration and dynamic range of three immunoassay systems using the same antibody. Anal Chem 79: 1954-1960. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17256970

4. Ohmura N., Lackie S.J., Saiki H. 2001. An immunoassay for small analytes with theoretical detection limits. Anal Chem 73: 3392-3399. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11476240

5. Blake D.A., Jones R.M., Blake R.C., Pavlov A.R., Darwish I.A., Yu H. 2001. Antibody-based sensors for heavy metal ions. Biosens Bioelectron 16: 799-809. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11679258

6. Glass T.R., Ohmura N., Saiki H. 2007. Least detectable concentration and dynamic range of three immunoassay systems using the same antibody. Anal Chem 79: 1959. Figure 4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17256970

 

Kinetischer Exklusions Ansatz, Theorie

Wie im Abschnitt über Reversible Bindung beschrieben, liegen nach dem Erreichen des Gleichgewichts, von Rezeptor und Ligand in Lösung, drei verschiedene Zustände vor, der Rezeptor, der Ligand und der Rezeptor-Ligand Komplex. Ein Kinetischer Exklusions Ansatz (KinExA®) misst die freie Konzentration des Rezeptors oder des Liganden ohne das Gleichgewicht zu beeinflussen. (Beachte: In der folgenden Beschreibung wird der Ligand im Ansatz immobilisiert, um die freien Rezeptoren in Lösung zu messen. Umgekehrt kann auch der Rezeptor immobilisiert werden, um die freien Liganden in der Lösung zu messen, abhängig vom verwendeten Material).

Die Messung des freien Rezeptors wird erreicht, indem die Lösung kurz einer Oberfläche exponiert wird, auf der der Ligand immobilisiert ist. Die Expositionszeit ist sehr wichtig, weil nur eine kurz gehaltene Expositionszeit der Probe zur immobilisierten Phase dazu führt, dass wirklich nur die freien Rezeptormoleküle signifikant an diese Phase binden. Der Kinetische Exklusions Ansatz unterscheidet sich darin von Kompetitionsansätzen, in denen die equilibrierte Lösung lang genug mit der Festphase in Kontakt ist, damit die Liganden der Festphase mit den Rezeptoren in Lösung konkurrieren können.

Der Vorteil des KinExA ist, dass das Signal des eingefangenen Rezeptors nur der freien, in Lösung vorkommenden, Konzentration dessen entspricht. Die Kenntnis der Konzentration des Rezeptors im Gleichgewicht (Equilibrium) erlaubt die Bestimmung der Bindungskonstanten, wie im Abschnitt Reversible Binding beschrieben.

Die kommerziell erhältlichen Instrumente für die KinExA-Methode (KinExA 3200 und 3100 von Sapidyne) verwenden eine kleine Säule, gefüllt mit Partikeln, über die das Probesystem und alle anderen Reagenzien laufen. Die Kontaktzeit, jeder Probe mit der Festphase, ist die Durchgangszeit durch die Säule und kann durch die Fliessgeschwindigkeit kontrolliert werden (zwischen ca. 50 Millisekunden und einer Sekunde).

Systeme mit Bindungswerten im nanomolaren Bereich, oder festere, sind im Kinetischen Exklusions Modus (KinExA mode). Schwächere Bindungskandidaten können ebenfalls noch gemessen werden, erfordern aber besondere Vorsicht, um das System nicht durch die Messung zu stören. KinExA ist besonders geeignet um Affinitäten und Kinetiken zu messen, und kann auch als verbesserte Immunoassay-Plattform dienen. Eine genauere Erklärung der KinExA Messung erfolgt im folgenden Text.

KinExA für Kd-Messungen:

Bindungskurven hängen von Kd und Rezeptor Konzentration ab (About Binding Curves). Eine Bindungskurve kann durch die Verwendung einer Konzentrationsreihe mit konstanter Rezeptor-Konzentration und einer Titrationsreihe des Liganden gemessen werden. Nach der Einstellung des Gleichgewichts (Equilibriums) wird eine KinExA-Messung mit der freien Rezeptor-Konzentration jeder einzelnen Titrationslösung vorgenommen. Dadurch repräsentiert der freie Rezeptor direkt die Bindungskurve. Diese wird dann zur Analyse des Kd (für niedrige Verhältniskurven) und Rezeptoraktivität (für hohe Verhältniskurven) herangezogen. Mehrere Kurven mit verschiedenen Rezeptorkonzentrationen können zusammen analysiert werden, um einen Kd-Wert und die aktive Rezeptorkonzentration zusammen zu bestimmen.

Die Verwendung von KinExA zur Bestimmung von Kd-Messwerten ist ideal, weil hierdurch die freie Rezeptorkonzentration gemessen werden kann, ohne das Lösungsgleichgewicht zu beeinflussen, das duch unmodifizierte Moleküle, uneingeschränkt in Lösung entstehen kann. Für eine akkurate Kd-Bestimmung sollte die verwendete Konzentration des Rezeptors, für die Messung, in der Nähe des Kd-Wertes liegen oder darunter. Mit den fest bindenden Antikörpern, die inzwischen routinemässig entwickelt werden (niedrig oder sub pM), sollten die Messungen in diesen niedrigen Konzentrationen vorgenommen werden. KinExA gewährleistet, für diese festen Bindungspartner, in diesen niedrigen Konzentrationsbereichen akkurate Kd-Messungen.

KinExA für kon und koff Messungen:

Messung der freien Rezeptorkonzentrationen können auch vor Erreichen des Gleichgewichts vorgenommen werden. Messungen, die vorgenommen wurden, bevor das System sein Gleichgewicht erreicht, liefern Daten für die Kinetik einer Reaktion. Zwei Methoden können für die Kinetik-Messung angewandt werden, die direkte Methode und die Injektions-Methode.

In der direkten Methode wird eine einzige Lösung für Rezeptor und Ligand hergestellt und der ungebundene Anteil wird wiederholt nach verschiedenen Zeitintervallen, auf dem Weg zum Gleichgewicht, gemessen. Die on-rate (Assoziationsrate), kon, kann aus der Bindungskurve errechnet werden. Diese direkte Methode setzt voraus, dass die Zeit bis zum Erreichen des Gleichgewichts lang genug ist, um einige Messungen, zu verschiedenen Zeitpunkten, vorzunehmen. Dieser Zeitraum kann durch die Verringerung der Ausgangskonzentrationen verlängert werden. Jedoch sollte die Konzentration oberhalb des Kd gehalten werden, damit eine signifikante Bindung erfolgt, wodurch einige schwache Bindungssysteme nicht genug verlangsamt werden können, um diese Methode anwenden zu können.

In diesem Fall, wo die Reaktion nicht genügend verlangsamt werden kann, um die direkte Methode anwenden zu können, kann die Injektions-Methode genutzt werden. Die Injektions-Methode kann sehr kurze Reaktionszeiten bewältigen, indem sie die Rezeptoren oberhalb der Messsäule in einen Ligandenstrom injiziert. Die Inkubationszeit wird dadurch auf die Zeit von der Injektionsmischung bis zum Auftreffen auf die Messsäule reduziert. Diese Zeit kann wiederum durch die Fliessgeschwindigkeit geregelt werden, im Bedarfsfall auf wenige Sekunden.

Im Vergleich zu Festphasen-Kinetik-Messungen, sind die Moleküle in der Reaktion unbeeinflusst und können sich frei in der Lösung bewegen. Zwischen der Kinetik-Messung in Lösung und Festphase1 besteht der Unterschied, dass diese in Lösung meist schneller2 sind, manchmal sogar viel schneller3

Die Dissoziationsrate, koff, kann auch direkt gemessen werden, obwohl sie gewöhnlich einfach aus der gemessenen Kd und kon berechnet wird, (koff = Kd * kon).

KinExA für Immunoassays:

Die endgültige Sensitivität jedes Immunoassays hängt von der Eigenschaft des verwendeten Antikörpers ab. Die meisten Immunoassays erreichen die potentielle Sensitivität nicht ganz, weil entweder die Messmethode die entsprechende Sensitivität nicht aufweist, um die Antikörper Eignung auszunutzen oder weil Kompetition die Assay-Sinsitivität einschränkt. Der Kinetische Exklusions-Ansatz verhindert die störende Kompetition und die hohe Messsensitivität (niedrige bis sub pM) ermöglicht die Bestimmung extrem fest bindender Antikörper-Kinetiken.4

In der Praxis hat sich gezeigt, dass KinExA bei den gleichen Reagentien 10- bis 1000-fach sensitiver ist als ELISA.5 In Japan wurde eine Studie am „Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEP)“ durchgeführt, finanziert durch die „New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)“. In dieser Studie wurden verschiedene Immunoassay Systeme verglichen, indem identische Reagenzien zu externen Labors gesendet und die Resultate der sensitivsten Immunoassays für jedes Set verglichen wurden. Die verwendeten Labore waren Biacore, für einen SPR-basierten Immunoassay, Sapidyne für einen KinExA-basierten Assay und „Kyoto Electronics Manufactureing (KEM)“ für ELISA. Für alle vier Reagenzien-Sets war KinExA die sensitivste und hatte die grösste dynamische Spannbreite.6 Tatsächlich hat „KEM“ seitdem, aufgrund der verbesserten Sensitivität, Geschwindigkeit und Genauigkeit gegenüber ELISA, eine Lizenz für die Anwendung von KinExA für ihre kommerzielle Dioxin Messsung erworben.

Referenzen

1. Blake II R.C., Delehanty J.B., Khosraviani M., Yu H., Jones R.M., Blake D.A. 2003. Allosteric binding properties of a monoclonal anti- body and its fab fragment. Biochem 42: 497-508. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12525177

2. Razai A., Garcia-Rodriguez C., Lou J., Geren I.N., Forsyth C.M., Robles Y., Tsai R., Smith T.J., Smith L.A., Siegel R.W., Feldhaus M., Marks J.D. 2005. Molecular evolution of antibody affinity for sensitive detection of botulinum neurotoxin type A. J Mol Biol 351: 158-169. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16002090

3. Glass T.R., Ohmura N., Saiki H. 2007. Least detectable concentration and dynamic range of three immunoassay systems using the same antibody. Anal Chem 79: 1954-1960. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17256970

4. Ohmura N., Lackie S.J., Saiki H. 2001. An immunoassay for small analytes with theoretical detection limits. Anal Chem 73: 3392-3399. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11476240

5. Blake D.A., Jones R.M., Blake R.C., Pavlov A.R., Darwish I.A., Yu H. 2001. Antibody-based sensors for heavy metal ions. Biosens Bioelectron 16: 799-809. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11679258

6. Glass T.R., Ohmura N., Saiki H. 2007. Least detectable concentration and dynamic range of three immunoassay systems using the same antibody. Anal Chem 79: 1959. Figure 4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17256970